Everyone can help fight homelessness
Cork is playing its part
Homelessness in Cork

The housing crisis is pushing people into homelessness and preventing people from leaving homelessness. Our Emergency Shelter is overflowing with an average of 53 people per night relying on a Cork Simon emergency bed. People are staying for longer and longer in emergency accommodation because they have no other options. Rents in Cork City increased 12% last year; Rent Supplement and Housing Assistance Payments do not come near asking rents.

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Emergency Shelter

Our Emergency Shelter is located on Anderson’s Quay, in the heart of Cork city centre. The Shelter provides care, accommodation and one-to-one support for 47 people around-the-clock, every day of the year. Demand for emergency beds is high – Throughout 2016 the Shelter accommodated an average of 54 people per night – the need for emergency accommodation is so great that we try to accommodate as many people as is safe to do so.

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Leaving A Legacy

If you know Cork, you know that we live in a caring community. And that sense of belonging, that feeling of community, was here before all of us – and will be here long after us.

Here at Cork Simon, we are blessed that our supporters have enriched our organisation – and our community – with their generous gifts.

What we’ve achieved, with the amazing support of our donors, represents our community at its very best. Read More


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June 24th, 7:23 pm

It can often be those unexpected moments that prove to be life-changing rather than the big, life-changing decisions. They can leave us standing among life’s rubble wondering what went wrong, or they can open doors to endless opportunities to start rebuilding a life all but lost. These moments can be filled with fear and uncertainty, especially if you’ve known hardship and hard luck for far too long. But they can also be filled with endless possibilities.

Recently, ‘Mark’ experienced one of those life-changing moments: the opportunity to have a home again, a full-time job and renewed hope. That moment came knocking on the pale green door of his room in our Emergency Shelter – ‘Mark, a room in a house has become available and we think you should have it’. He embraced that moment with both hands and the biggest smile in his heart. Homelessness doesn’t end overnight. But with every knock on those doors in our shelter and with every conversation that begins with good news and a chance of a home, someone’s life has the chance to begin again.
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It can often be those unexpected moments that prove to be life-changing rather than the big, life-changing decisions. They can leave us standing among life’s rubble wondering what went wrong, or they can open doors to endless opportunities to start rebuilding a life all but lost. These moments can be filled with fear and uncertainty, especially if you’ve known hardship and hard luck for far too long. But they can also be filled with endless possibilities.Recently, ‘Mark’ experienced one of those life-changing moments: the opportunity to have a home again, a full-time job and renewed hope. That moment came knocking on the pale green door of his room in our Emergency Shelter – ‘Mark, a room in a house has become available and we think you should have it’.  He embraced that moment with both hands and the biggest smile in his heart. Homelessness doesn’t end overnight. But with every knock on those doors in our shelter and with every conversation that begins with good news and a chance of a home, someone’s life has the chance to begin again.

June 23rd, 7:15 pm

“There are days when it’s hard not to lose hope,” Shelter staff member Paul says. “Often people can feel frustrated or marginalised because we can’t give them a bed or get them a home of their own. There just aren’t enough houses right now. If we could have everyone in houses, we’d do it in a heartbeat.”

It’s a situation Paul knows only too well - having to say ‘no’ to people. More people in need of an emergency bed than there are beds available means people end up frustrated and exhausted. Our 47 bed Shelter currently accommodates around 52 people every night. We try hard to accommodate as many people as is safe to do so each night but it’s not enough. Housing for people stuck in the shelter for far too long is the only solution. Housing will end homelessness. People deserve better.
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“There are days when it’s hard not to lose hope,” Shelter staff member Paul says. “Often people can feel frustrated or marginalised because we can’t give them a bed or get them a home of their own. There just aren’t enough houses right now. If we could have everyone in houses, we’d do it in a heartbeat.”It’s a situation Paul knows only too well - having to say ‘no’ to people. More people in need of an emergency bed than there are beds available means people end up frustrated and exhausted. Our 47 bed Shelter currently accommodates around 52 people every night. We try hard to accommodate as many people as is safe to do so each night but it’s not enough.  Housing for people stuck in the shelter for far too long is the only solution. Housing will end homelessness. People deserve better.

June 22nd, 7:42 pm

The alarm clock that greets someone who is homeless is often the sound of the dump trucks collecting rubbish around the city, the buses as they begin their early morning routes and the sleepy stirrings of the city as it begins a new day.

Sounds to which that person wakes, packs whatever little they have and move on. One morning earlier this month, one person who has spent years starting each day to those sounds of the city, , was greeted by something much different….the sound of silence. The silence that greets you in the morning when you get to sleep in your own bed, in your own home.

It’s a sound many of us take for granted, but someone newly housed straight from the streets to the fresh sheets of his own home, it’s the most wonderful sound in the world. Believe in People.
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The alarm clock that greets someone who is homeless is often the sound of the dump trucks collecting rubbish around the city, the buses as they begin their early morning routes and the sleepy stirrings of the city as it begins a new day.Sounds to which that person wakes, packs whatever little they have and move on.  One morning earlier this month, one person who has spent years starting each day to those sounds of the city, , was greeted by something much different….the sound of silence. The silence that greets you in the morning when you get to sleep in your own bed, in your own home.It’s a sound many of us take for granted, but someone newly housed straight from the streets to the fresh sheets of his own home, it’s the most wonderful sound in the world. Believe in People.

June 21st, 7:07 pm

“Everyone knows about the high level of homelessness in Cork. People are in dire straits. It’s not hard to understand why we wanted to do something as a community-based orchestra to help people who are most vulnerable in our community,” Adrian, the Chairperson of Cork Concert Orchestra says.

The Cork Concert Orchestra are doing their bit in the fight against homelessness on Saturday 24 June from 8.00pm -10.30pm when they’ll present a Night at the Musicals at Cork City Hall. The night promises to be an orchestral trip through some of the world’s best loved musicals, From Les Mis & Phantom of the Opera, to Wicked & West Side Story. For more information and tickets please email Kate Hargrave at kate.hargrave@corksimon.ie or call Kate 021 4929 415.
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June 20th, 7:41 pm

Two weeks can be an eternity when you’re waiting for something that could change your life for the better.

Maura a resident in our Emergency Shelter is facing into that eternity, but she won’t be facing it on her own. Shelter staff member Chrissie knows the challenge facing her: “You and I would think nothing of waiting two weeks but for her, in here…two weeks waiting to get into a treatment centre…staying sober; it’s an eternity. But we’re with her in this, keeping her focused, doing everything we can to get her there.”

For the next two weeks Maura will have all the support and encouragement she needs to help get her through the next two weeks to that point where her life could change for the better. It couldn’t happen without your ongoing support. Your help puts you right there with her…every step of the way.. Thank you for believing in People.
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Two weeks can be an eternity when you’re waiting for something that could change your life for the better.Maura a resident in our Emergency Shelter is facing into that eternity, but she won’t be facing it on her own. Shelter staff member Chrissie knows the challenge facing her: “You and I would think nothing of waiting two weeks but for her, in here…two weeks waiting to get into a treatment centre…staying sober; it’s an eternity. But we’re with her in this, keeping her focused, doing everything we can to get her there.”For the next two weeks Maura will have all the support and encouragement she needs to help get her through the next two weeks to that point where her life could change for the better. It couldn’t happen without your ongoing support.  Your help puts you right there with her…every step of the way.. Thank you for believing in People.

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Best of luck to her..xx

Best of luck to het



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