Increase in Adults in Emergency Accommodation in Cork
Figures from the Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government
Increase in Adults in Emergency Accommodation in Cork

“When I starts going in [to the Emergency Shelter] I didn’t know what to be expecting. I’d never been in that situation before. And to be honest I was just sitting there looking around me thinking what am I after doing to myself.”

Read more HOME TRUTHS

Cork Simon Emergency Beds
More people in need of a bed and people staying for longer

During 2017, an average of 53 people per night relied on a Cork Simon emergency bed. This figure has risen from an average of 50 people per night in 2015 and 47 people per night in 2014. In addition, since November 2017, we have provided an extra 15 places every night in our Day Centre with support from Cork City Council. These places are basic; mattresses and sleeping bags, but they at least provide respite from the outdoors.

Average length of stay at our Emergency Shelter has increased 37% in 5 years rising from 39 nights in 2013 to 62 nights in 2017.

26% increase in Long Term Homelessness in 4 years

57 people staying at our Emergency Shelter in 2017 were long term homeless.

Long term homelessness, defined by Government as continuous or episodic stays of 6 months or more in emergency accommodation over the past 12 months, increased at our Emergency Shelter by almost a quarter between 2014 and 2016.

Rents at all time high. Supply at all time low.

According to Daft.ie’s latest rental report (Q2 2018), rents in Cork City increased 10.5% in the 12 months to June 2018, bringing average rent in Cork City to €1,266 – the highest on record and 25% higher than peak prices recorded more than a decade.

According to the same report, 640 homes were available to rent in Munster on August 1st – 7% lower than the same day in 2017. Our most recent Locked Out of the Market report found that over 3 days in May 2018 there was an average of just 49 properties available to rent in Cork City Centre.

While the introduction of Rent Pressure Zones and the capping of rent increases in these zones to 4% per annum is a positive step, we continue to call for full rent certainty linking annual rent reviews to the consumer price index.

“The prices are ridiculous. It’s Cork at the minute; it’s crazy to get anywhere, like. You find one that’s in your price range and there’s six, seven other people in front of you there and a lot of them have cash in their hand ready to go because they know how hard it is. I’ve got so many times just refused, just refused.”

Read more HOME TRUTHS

Average rent for a 1 bedroom property in Cork City is 68% higher than the Rent Allowance / HAP limit for a single person.

Tracking daft.ie over 3 days in May 2018, there were 0 properties available in Cork City within the Rent Allowance / HAP limit for a single person.

“And even with the rent allowance, it makes no difference to me. It’s no benefit.”.

Read more HOME TRUTHS

Average rent for a 2 bedroom property in Cork City is 15% higher than the Rent Allowance / HAP limit for a couple / single parent and two children.

Tracking daft.ie over 3 days in May 2018, there were 0 properties available in Cork City within this Rent Allowance / HAP limit.

Renters are at High Risk of Poverty

The Survey on Income and Living Conditions (SILC) in Ireland, compiled by the CSO, found almost 1 in 6 people in Ireland (17%) are at risk of poverty.

However 61% of people in rental accommodation are at risk of poverty. The CSO deemed anyone with an annual income of less than €12,000 to be at risk of poverty.

House Prices in Cork are unaffordable

According to Daft.ie’s Irish House Price Report Q2 2018, house prices in Cork City and County increased 6.9% and 4.1% respectively during 2018.

The Housing Agency has ranked house prices in Cork as ‘Moderately Unaffordable’.

Increasingly unaffordable house prices will drive more people to look for, and stay longer in, rental accommodation, further increasing demand in the private rental sector.

Repair and Lease Scheme holds promise

If just 1.2% of vacant properties in Cork City were ‘repaired and leased’, 53 people – the number of people on average staying each night in a Cork Simon Emergency Bed – could be housed.

If just 6.5% of vacant properties in Cork City were ‘repaired and leased’, 298 people – the number of people in Emergency Accommodation in Cork – could have a home of their own.

* 298 adults were recorded as staying in Emergency Accommodation in Cork during 1 week in November 2017, according to the Department of Housing, Community and Local Government.

According to the latest census, there are 4,491 vacant homes (excluding holiday homes) in Cork City. Throughout all of Cork there are over 20,000 vacant properties.

Will You Help Save A Life by making a donation to Cork Simon today

“If you have an addiction it’ll get worse if you’re out on the streets because you’re so depressed and you feel so low in yourself, so dirty.”

Read more HOME TRUTHS

Learn more about Homelessness in Cork